Meditation

I tried a new $3000 chair that promises to help you meditate like a pro – Fast Company

Summary

I’m lying on a bench that feels soft and bouncy underneath my body. I’m somewhere toward the end of the session when the vibrations come to a halt. By then, the soundscape in my headphones has reached a crescendo, I can feel a constellation of lights flickering behind my closed eyelids, and my body feels a little tingly. For a split second, I feel like I’m hurtling through space like Matthew McConaughey in Interstellar. Then all the stimuli fade and a soft voice beckons me to take a few…….

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I’m lying on a bench that feels soft and bouncy underneath my body. I’m somewhere toward the end of the session when the vibrations come to a halt. By then, the soundscape in my headphones has reached a crescendo, I can feel a constellation of lights flickering behind my closed eyelids, and my body feels a little tingly. For a split second, I feel like I’m hurtling through space like Matthew McConaughey in Interstellar. Then all the stimuli fade and a soft voice beckons me to take a few deep breaths. The most high-tech meditation session I’ve ever experienced is over.

[Image: Resonate]

Before I get any further, let me preface this by saying that I don’t meditate, though I have tried. At the height of lockdown last year, I cycled through a few apps, including Calm and Headspace. I also tried lying on my bed in silence, but sooner or later my mental to-do list would come crashing back. All of this to say, I had high hopes for Resonate, a new $3,000 chair that uses a combination of vibration, sound, and flickers of light to help people meditate more easily.

[Image: Resonate]

The chair, which launches for pre-sale today and will be available in early 2022, is the brainchild of Emmy Bush, a biomedical engineer-turned-entrepreneur, and Daniel Lennon, a former active-duty Navy pilot, also turned entrepreneur. Both shared a passion for meditation and set out to build a chair that can take you “from 60 to 0 in 20 minutes,” as the brand’s tagline says. I spent 20 minutes in the chair. I can’t say I got to zero, but I did get further than if I’d just been lying on my bed, still and silent, for 20 minutes. Either way, the experience left me wondering about the role furniture can play in improving our mental health, particularly when it seems to be backed by science.

Resonate looks like the kind of sleek lounge chair and ottoman you might find in James Bond’s villa overlooking Hollywood, with the high-tech accessories to match. The version I tried was only a prototype, but it came with all the bells and whistles: a cushy bench that sends an array of vibration patterns from head to toe, a pair of headphones that plays binaural beats (we’ll get to that later), and a padded eye mask that produces flickers of light when your eyes are closed.

[Image: Resonate]

Each stimulus has a purpose. Bush explains that the vibrations stimulate your vagus nerve, which runs up your back and behind your ears and plays an important role in balancing the nervous system. Stimulating the nerve has shown promise as a therapeutic option in anxiety disorders like PTSD.

Meanwhile, the soundscape in the headphones uses binaural beats, an emerging form of sound-wave therapy that makes use of the fact that the right and left ear each receive a slightly different frequency …….

Source: https://www.fastcompany.com/90698396/i-tried-a-new-3000-chair-that-promises-to-help-you-meditate-like-a-pro